Courses

FALL 2019 Japanese Language Course Offerings

  • Elementary Japanese II, TBA
    EALJ10002-01 CRN 17192

This course is a continuation of Elementary Japanese I. It is the second half of the two 3-credit course sequence (Elementary Japanese I and II) that covers the same materials as the 5-credit First Year Japanese I. Upon completion of this course, students will be ready to enroll in First Year Japanese II (5 credits) in the following spring semester.Students will continue their acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The emphasis of the course will be on mastery of the fundamental grammatical structure of Japanese through aural-oral exercises and practice. The course covers Chapters 4-7 of NAKAMA 1. Mastery of hiragana, katakana and kanji, taught in EALJ 10001, is assumed. Additional 40 kanji will be introduced. 

  • First Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ10111-01 2 Sections (CRN 12139 CRN 12140)

This course is designed for students who have not studied Japanese language before. The goal of this class is to gain an acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese-reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will learn to read and write Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. This course covers Chapters 1-6 in Nakama l . First year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 10111) section and one TR (EALJ 11111) lab. 

  • First Year Readings in Japanese I, Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ10121-02 CRN 14563

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • First Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ11111-01 2 Sections CRN15904 CRN 13562

EALJ 11111 is the lab corequisite of EALJ 10111 

  • Second Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ20211-01 CRN 15068 CRN 10746

This course is designed for students who have completed one year of college-level Japanese or its equivalent. Students will build on their acquisition of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening from first year; they will increase their fluency in both speaking and listening, construct increasingly longer and more complex sentences, and recognize and produce approximately 420 kanji. This course covers Chapters 7-12 in Nakama I. Second Year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 20211) section and one TR (EALJ 21211) lab. 

  • Second Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ20251-02 CRN 14564

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • Second Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ21211-01 CRN 15069 CRN 13563

EALJ 21211 is the corequisite lab of EALJ 20211. 

  • Third Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ30311-02 CRN 15905

A course designed for students who have completed two years of college-level Japanese. Students will expand their vocabulary and learn approximately 300 new kanji words. They will develop their understanding of Japanese culture, comparing the cultural differences between their own society and that of contemporary Japan. Students will build on their reading, writing, speaking, and listening abilities, conversing in paragraphs, not just sentences, practicing narration and description, and applying more critical and analytical reading and interpretive skills . Third year Japanese is a 4 credit course; students must enroll in both the class and the lab. 

  • Third Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ30351-01 CRN 14216

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • Third Year Listening in Japanese, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ 30362 CRN 19639

This class consists of two parts. One is a group discussion led each time by one of the students, who chooses a topic on real-world events and social issues by using various media resources. The other part is individual listening/viewing activities with authentic contexts. Students choose their own audiovisual materials, such as news, movies, animations, music, or recitation, in order to increase their input and improve their overall language proficiency. Through these student-centered activities, students will be able to learn to express more complex ideas and opinions, cultivate critical thinking, work together in teams, and deepen their awareness to become global citizens. 

  • Third Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ31311-02 CRN 15906

EALJ 31311 is the corequisite lab to EALJ 30311 

  • Fourth Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ40451-01 CRN 14291

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • Fourth Year Listening in Japanese, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ 30362 CRN 19640

This class consists of two parts. One is a group discussion led each time by one of the students, who chooses a topic on real-world events and social issues by using various media resources. The other part is individual listening/viewing activities with authentic contexts. Students choose their own audiovisual materials, such as news, movies, animations, music, or recitation, in order to increase their input and improve their overall language proficiency. Through these student-centered activities, students will be able to learn to express more complex ideas and opinions, cultivate critical thinking, work together in teams, and deepen their awareness to become global citizens. 

  • Fifth Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ50551-01 CRN 14292

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • Fifth Year Listening in Japanese, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ 30362 CRN 19641

This class consists of two parts. One is a group discussion led each time by one of the students, who chooses a topic on real-world events and social issues by using various media resources. The other part is individual listening/viewing activities with authentic contexts. Students choose their own audiovisual materials, such as news, movies, animations, music, or recitation, in order to increase their input and improve their overall language proficiency. Through these student-centered activities, students will be able to learn to express more complex ideas and opinions, cultivate critical thinking, work together in teams, and deepen their awareness to become global citizens.

  • Literature University Seminar, Prof. Michael Brownstein
    LLEA13186-02 CRN 15907

An introduction to the study of East Asian literature. The course will focus on either Chinese or Japanese literature. 

  • Ancient Japan, Prof. Thomas Julia
    LLEA30110-01 CRN 19800

History is not a single "true story," but many competing narratives, each defined by values, interests, and political commitments. This course on ancient Japanese history provides an overview of three sets of competing narratives: first, the politically charged question of Japan's origins, when we explore archeological evidence and chronicles of the Sun Goddess; second, the question of whether culture (through continental imports of writing, religious forms, and statecraft) or nature (as disease and environmental degradation) defined the Yamato state from the sixth to the ninth century; and, third, whether Heian court power rested on economic, political, military, judicial, or aesthetic grounds and if its foundations were undermined internally or by the invasion of the Mongols. In examining these competing narratives, we aim to develop the disciplined imagination necessary to enter another culture and another time. 

  • The Samurai: Classical Japanese Literature, Prof. Michael Brownstein
    LLEA33317-01 CRN 19560

The sword-wielding samurai warrior is perhaps the most familiar icon of pre-modern Japan, one that continues to influence how Japanese think of themselves and how others think of Japan even in modern times. Who were the samurai? How did they see themselves? How did other members of Japanese society see them in the past? How did the role and the image of the samurai change over time? To answer these questions, we will explore the depiction of samurai in various kinds of texts: episodes from quasi-historical chronicles, 14th century Noh plays, 18th century Kabuki and puppet plays (many Kabuki plays (a theater of live actors), were first written for the puppet theater). While some of these texts emphasize themes loyalty, honor, and military prowess, others focus on the problems faced by samurai in their domestic lives. The last part of the course will be devoted to the most famous of all samurai stories, The Revenge of the 47 Samurai. Students will read eyewitness accounts of this vendetta, which occurred in 1703, and then explore how the well-known Kabuki/puppet play, Chushingura (A Treasury of Loyal Retainers, 1748) dramatizes the conflicting opinions surrounding it. All readings will be English translation and no previous knowledge of Japan is required. 

  • Modern Japanese Literature, Prof. Marianne Tarcov
    LLEA33320-01 CRN 17195

This course is an introduction to the major authors and works of Japan's modern period, from the 18th century through the middle of the 20th century. We will examine writers, works and literary institutions in historical context to explore how Japanese writers engaged with the changing world in the modern era. This was the period when modern literature, more specifically the novel, was emerging internationally as a new technology of state-building. Early modern Japan was highly literate with a flourishing popular culture that included diverse literary forms (high and low) that would be refashioned, contested and sometimes abandoned as the institution of literature would come to be established by the turn of the 20th century, although not without ongoing contestation. The rise of the novel (shosetsu) as exemplar of literature corresponded with Japan's rise to imperialist power over the fifty-year build-up of the empire. Our themes will include: elite and popular literature; the West, Orientalism and Counter-Orientalism; protest literature by women, workers and ethnic minorities; empire and resistance; modernism and modernity. Authors will include: Higuchi Ichiyo, Natsume Soseki, Tamura Toshiko, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Kobayashi Takiji, Edogawa Rampo, and others. 

  • Banned Books of Japan, Prof. Marianne Tarcov
    LLEA33325-01 CRN 19564

​​​​​​​This course will look at two kinds of censorship: morality censorship, which regulates material related to sexuality and public decency, and political censorship, which regulates subversive material. This course will explore the surprisingly symbiotic relationship between censorship and literature, where both systems are dependent one upon the other. Does modern literature actually need censorship to create a certain relationship to the state and to political expression? Course texts will include books censored or banned for obscenity, such as Mori Ogai's Vita Sexualis and Tanizaki Jun'ichir's Naomi, as well as works that were regulated for politically subversive content, such as Proletarian and Anarchist literature. We will go from the prewar period to wartime censorship, followed by censorship under the US Occupation of Japan, and finally into the present day by looking at the Rokudenashiko case, in which a feminist artist was arrested for disseminating images of her own vagina. 

Past Course Offerings

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