Courses

Language courses are offered in Chinese, Japanese and Korean from beginning to advanced levels. We also offer the honors track program.

The department also has several literature and culture courses that are taught in English for those unable to study the language but interested in the traditions.

FALL 2018 East Asian Literature and Culture Courses  

  • Literature University Seminar, Prof. Xian Wang
    LLEA13186-01 CRN 13371
This course pays particular attention to gender relations and representations of sexuality in modern Chinese narrative. This course will require close readings of translated Chinese novels, short stories and movies. We will explore themes and motifs such as gender roles in Confucianism, female chastity, same sex desire, cross-dressing, masculinity and femininity, manhood and misogyny, eroticism, the cult of qing (passion), the New Woman, socialist and post-socialist desires, and writing bodies in the era of globalization. In addition to providing a platform for appreciation of the aesthetic beauty of Chinese narrative, the course encourages students to think about how representations of gender and sexuality incorporate or confront the mainstream moral values and social principles in modern China.
 
All readings are in English, no prior knowledge of Chinese language or culture is required.  
 
  • Literature University Seminar, Prof. Michael Brownstein
    LLEA13186-02 CRN 16755
In this course, we will study five novels by modern Japanese writers (in English translation) as a way of exploring the theme of “Otherness.” Otherness may be subjective—the sense of being an outsider, of being different, but there is also the Otherness of the stranger, the foreigner, of even those who are closest to us. The novels are: Silence by Shusaku End, Kokoro by Natsume Soseki, Masks by Enchi Fumiko, Woman in the Dunes by Abe Kobo, and All She Was Worth by Miyuki Miyabe. By reading, discussing, and writing about these novels, you will also have the opportunity to explore how fictional narratives work to produce meaning, share your critical insights with others and improve your writing skills.
  • Introduction to Linguistics, Prof. Hana Kang
    LLEA20001-03 CRN 15571
This course emphasizes language structure, including phonetics (the sounds of language), phonology (the sound systems of language), morphology and lexicon (structured meanings in words), morphemes (units of meaning), syntax, and semantics. 
  • Topics in Linguistics, Prof. Hana Kang
    LLEA20304-01 CRN 15572
This course offers a comprehensive understanding of digital literacy in relation to teaching and researching language acquisition. Students will learn a variety of digital writing technologies and be trained to think critically about cultural and communicative consequences of the digital media. Students will also gain the critical perspective and literacy tools needed to actively apply in language teaching and researching. 
  • Introduction to Art of ChinaTBA
    LLEA20702-01 CRN 20292
This course is an introduction to the arts of China, covering the period from prehistory to the twentieth century. It focuses on major monuments and artworks produced in imperial, aristocratic, literati, religious, and public milieus ? we look at bronze, jade, figure and landscape paintings, underground architecture (tombs), cave temples, and calligraphy, as well as artworks that manifest Confucius teaching, folkloric beliefs, and political ideologies. Class meetings are composed of lectures and discussions of required reading and images. Lectures reconstruct the function and the meaning of objects in order to better understand Chinese culture through the objects it produced. Students become familiar with the traditional Chinese world and acquire the knowledge necessary to be an informed viewer of Chinese art. 
  • Early Chinese EmpiresProf. Liang Cai
    LLEA30147-01 CRN 15684
Our understanding of early Chinese Empires is primarily determined by the available sources and our methodologies. This seminar will provide advanced undergraduates with a critical introduction to the most important sources and major themes, both textual and archaeological, for the study of early imperial China. We will consider materials from the earliest historical period, circa 1300 B.C., down to the consolidation of the empire in the first century B.C. We will focus on outstanding problems and controversies pertaining to this period, such as the relationship between archaeology and classical historiography, the nature of the Chinese writing system, myth and history, the textual history of the transmitted texts, Chinese empires and its rivals, and gender issues in ancient China. Finally, we will consider the basic methodological tools presently used by historians, textual critics, paleographers, and archaeologists. 
  • Chinese Civilization & CultureProf. Xiaoshan Yang
    LLEA30403-01 CRN 14874

This course surveys Chinese culture and civilization from the beginnings to the present time. Readings include traditional historical, philosophical, political, religious and literary texts as well as modern scholarship. Students are encouraged to bring in their experience, living or reading, of Western culture in order to form comparative and reflective perspectives. 

  • Chinese Popular CultureProf. Xian Wang
    LLEA30404-01 CRN 20010

This course introduces Chinese popular culture through the lens of contemporary Chinese cultural phenomena, including food culture, popular music, documentary films, martial arts movies, copycat culture, youth culture, and social media. It will be organized thematically. The lectures will introduce the major themes, including gender issues, social justice, government censorship, subcultures, family and state, localization and globalization, in a broad form and employ examples and case studies to provide students with a better understanding of actual Chinese society as it exists today. We will investigate the historical, sociopolitical, and aesthetical roots and impacts of the cultural phenomena.All readings are in English, no prior knowledge of Chinese language or culture is required. 

  • Introduction to Japanese Civ & CultureProf. Michael Brownstein
    LLEA30413-01 CRN 18821

This course provides an overview of the historical development of Japanese civilization and culture from the prehistoric era up through the 19th Century. Students will acquire a basic knowledge of Japanese geography, historical periods, changing class structure and political organization. The main emphasis, however, is on the development of the fine arts, such as painting, architecture, gardens, and sculpture. The course also introduces students to the important and continuous influence of Chinese art, literature, Buddhism and Confucianism. Through readings of selected literary works (prose fiction, poetry, essays on aesthetics), students will learn how shared aesthetic values changed over time in relation to their social and political context. 

  • Contention in ChinaProf. Victoria Hui
    LLEA30492-01 CRN 15685

Why do pro-democracy efforts in China repeatedly fail? If Chinese leaders aim to build a harmonious society, why are there routine contentious protests by workers, peasants, religious followers, middle-class property owners, lawyers, and minorities? How do the marginalized and disadvantaged fight against social injustices in China? Why is there no organized democracy movement despite the prevalence of sporadic protests? Is Confucianism preventing Chinese development towards a more democratic society? This course examines key contentious episodes in modern China, from the 1911 Revolution through the Cultural Revolution and the Tiananmen Movement to more scattered rightful resistance and minority protests in recent years. 

  • Classical ChineseProf. Yongping Zhu
    LLEA30501-01 CRN 15180

LLEA 30501 is an introductory course to classical Chinese for students who have completed at least 4th year Chinese or its equivalent. Students will learn a variety of texts ranging from idiom stories to canonical works such as Confucian Analects and Mencius. Classroom discussion emphasizes on sentence structures, the usage of grammatical particles, and Chinese culture. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to understand the main structures of classical Chinese, appreciate the differences between classical Chinese and modern Chinese, and be able to translate classical texts into modern Chinese. They will learn more about Chinese history and culture and acquire the basic skills of using classical Chinese in formal situations and writings. The course helps to lay a solid foundation for future advanced research on traditional Chinese culture or modern Chinese society. As the course is conducted exclusively in Chinese, students will also be able to solidify and enhance their proficiency in modern Chinese. Credits earned from this course may be used to fulfill Chinese major and minor requirements for upper-division courses in Chinese literature and culture. 

  • Chinese Literary TraditionsProf. Xiaoshan Yang
    LLEA33102-01 CRN 14478

A survey course introducing students to the major themes and genres of Chinese literature through selected readings of representative texts.

  • Modern Japanese Literature, Prof. Marianne Tarcov
    LLEA33320-01 CRN 19631

This course is an introduction to the major authors and works of Japan's modern period, from the 18th century through the middle of the 20th century. We will examine writers, works and literary institutions in historical context to explore how Japanese writers engaged with the changing world in the modern era. This was the period when modern literature, more specifically the novel, was emerging internationally as a new technology of state-building. Early modern Japan was highly literate with a flourishing popular culture that included diverse literary forms (high and low) that would be refashioned, contested and sometimes abandoned as the institution of literature would come to be established by the turn of the 20th century, although not without ongoing contestation. The rise of the novel (shosetsu) as exemplar of literature corresponded with Japan's rise to imperialist power over the fifty-year build-up of the empire. Our themes will include: elite and popular literature; the West, Orientalism and Counter-Orientalism; protest literature by women, workers and ethnic minorities; empire and resistance; modernism and modernity. Authors will include: Higuchi Ichiyo, Natsume Soseki, Tamura Toshiko, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Kobayashi Takiji, Edogawa Rampo, and others. 

  • An Introduction to Japanese HorrorProf. Marianne Tarcov
    LLEA33322-01 CRN 19632

This course will be an introduction to the genre of Japanese horror, with an emphasis on film, as well as other media like fiction, comics, and visual art. We will explore the evolution of horror in Japan from the ghost stories of the Edo period, to early cinematic works in the 1920s like A Page of Madness, to mid-century and postwar films by great directors like Kenji Mizoguchi. Finally, we will explore the J-Horror boom in the 1990s and 2000s with such classic films as Ring and Ju-on: The Grudge. What are the characteristics of horror as a genre? What can we learn from horror films, texts, and other artworks? How do they illuminate their historical context, and why do they continue to fascinate viewers and readers? 

  • An Asia of Global AffairsProf. Lionel Jensen
    LLEA40001-01 CRN 20109

An Asia of Global Affairs is an interdisciplinary, upper level undergraduate/graduate course that focuses on the culture, history, political ecology, and international effects of Asian powers. The objective of this course is to understand the multiple domestic and foreign forces that constitute the expanding global presence of the nations and regions known as ?Asia.? Along the path toward this objective, students will obtain the perspectives of a variety of Asian studies specialists as well as visiting guest lecturers whose work is drawn from today's geography of international urgency: Burma, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Philippines, Vietnam. 

  • From Magazines to the Internet: Media and Culture in Modern China, Prof. Michel Hockx
    LLEA40613-01 CRN 15574

Soon after modern printing technology was introduced by western missionaries in the 19th century, China developed an exciting new culture characterized by tremendous creativity and productivity, enthusiastic experimentation with media technologies, high-speed interaction between creators and users, and countless unique ways of mixing textual and visual material. Ranging from the pictorial magazines of the early twentieth century to the Internet sites of the early twenty-first century, China's modern culture has expressed and engaged with massive historical, social, and political changes, captured in writing and in images. This course takes students on a whirlwind tour of modern Chinese cultural expression in newspapers, magazines, posters, films, TV shows, websites, and social media, using original visual materials in addition to readings in English translation. The aim is to provide students with a comprehensive overview of the main developments in modern Chinese culture, while training their ability to analyze different types of cultural products. At the end of the course, students will produce their own magazine issue or website, using visual and textual material to express their own critical opinions on the materials we studied. 

  • Staging China: Performance, Identity and the Global ImaginaryProf. Tarryn Chun
    LLEA40616-01 CRN 19977

Performances of identity and politics color our perceptions of individuals, nations, and cultures. In no case is this truer than that of China, which has emerged in recent decades as a key player on the world stage and an oft-represented figure in the theater proper. This course takes the theatrical proscenium as a frame for exploring questions of the representation, construction, and reception of Chinese identity over the last century: how has the theater itself contributed to definitions and redefinitions of national culture? How does theater by Chinese-speaking or ethnically Chinese communities outside the national borders of the Peoples Republic of China complicate and contest national identity? And how can theories of performance help us to understand these processes and their relationship to audiences, both local and global? We will move through representative theatrical work from the geographic and political center of mainland China, the periphery of Chinese communities in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Southeast Asia, and beyond. As we expand outward, we will discover the ways in which works of theater and acts of performance can both establish and decenter notions of national, linguistic, and cultural identity. 

FALL 2018 Chinese Language Course Offerings

  • Elementary Chinese II, Prof. Congcong Ma
    EALC10002-01 CRN 14884

This course is a continuation of Elementary Chinese I. It is the second half of the two 3-credit course sequence (Elementary Chinese I and II) that covers the same materials as the 5-credit First Year Chinese I. Upon completion of this course, students will be ready to enroll in First Year Chinese II (5 credits) in the following spring semester.Students will continue their acquisition of the four basic language skills in Chinese: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Additional frequently used Chinese characters, vocabulary, and fundamental grammatical structures will be introduced. The emphasis of the course will be on accurate and appropriate communication in Mandarin Chinese. 

  • First Year Chinese I, Prof. Congcong Ma
    EALC10111-01 CRN 11339

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese using simplified characters with equal emphasis on the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. At the end of the first year, students may expect to comprehend and produce simple questions statements, high-frequency commands, and courtesy formulas; to pronounce learned vocabulary and short phrases with correct tones; to read simple texts and standardized messages, phrases, or expressions; and to master the pinyin Romanization and write simple expressions and short sentences in simplified characters. First Year Chinese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 10111) section and one TR (EALC 11111) lab. 

  • First Year Chinese I, Prof. Congcong Ma
    EALC10111-02 CRN 11987

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese using simplified characters with equal emphasis on the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. At the end of the first year, students may expect to comprehend and produce simple questions statements, high-frequency commands, and courtesy formulas; to pronounce learned vocabulary and short phrases with correct tones; to read simple texts and standardized messages, phrases, or expressions; and to master the pinyin Romanization and write simple expressions and short sentences in simplified characters. First Year Chinese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 10111) section and one TR (EALC 11111) lab. 

  • First Year Chinese I, Prof. Congcong Ma
    EALC10111-03 CRN 12328

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese using simplified characters with equal emphasis on the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. At the end of the first year, students may expect to comprehend and produce simple questions statements, high-frequency commands, and courtesy formulas; to pronounce learned vocabulary and short phrases with correct tones; to read simple texts and standardized messages, phrases, or expressions; and to master the pinyin Romanization and write simple expressions and short sentences in simplified characters. First Year Chinese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 10111) section and one TR (EALC 11111) lab. 

  • First Year Chinese I, Prof. Congcong Ma
    EALC10111-04 CRN 17639

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese using simplified characters with equal emphasis on the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. At the end of the first year, students may expect to comprehend and produce simple questions statements, high-frequency commands, and courtesy formulas; to pronounce learned vocabulary and short phrases with correct tones; to read simple texts and standardized messages, phrases, or expressions; and to master the pinyin Romanization and write simple expressions and short sentences in simplified characters. First Year Chinese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 10111) section and one TR (EALC 11111) lab. 

  • First Year Chinese I (4-Day Track), Prof. Chengxu Yin
    EALC10121-01 CRN 14895

This course combines traditional classroom instruction with online learning. It covers the same materials as regular First Year Chinese I, and students earn 5 credits. The class meets 4 times a week instead of 5, with one hour of online study completed by students at a time of their convenience. Those who complete this course may take either 1st Yr Chinese 2 (4-Day Track) or First Year Chinese II in the following spring semester. 

  • First Year Readings in Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC10151-01 CRN 15565

This course is intended primarily for students who meet the prerequisites for First Year Chinese. It offers students opportunities to enhance their Chinese reading skills utilizing Extensive Reading method. Students will choose their own reading materials varying from graded readers to authentic texts strategically collected for them. The materials should be at or slightly below the level at which students can read smoothly and quickly without consulting dictionaries or resorting to the practice of translation. They will be guided by the instructor to read large amounts of varied and interesting self-selected materials for both pleasure and information. Incorporating other activities such as group discussions, book reports, presentations, peer tutorials, and student-instructor consultations, the course will enable students not only to boost their Chinese reading proficiency but also to enhance their general language competence, resulting in more effective reading strategies, richer vocabulary, better writing skills, and increased knowledge of Chinese history, culture, and society. 

  • First Year Chinese I Drill, Prof. Chengxu Yin
    EALC11111-01 CRN 13751

EALC 11111 is the lab corequisite for EALC 10111. 

  • First Year Chinese I Drill, Prof. Chengxu Yin
    EALC11111-02 CRN 13752

EALC 11111 is the lab corequisite for EALC 10111. 

  • First Year Chinese I Drill, Prof. Chengxu Yin
    EALC11111-03 CRN 13750

EALC 11111 is the lab corequisite for EALC 10111. 

  • Second Year Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC20211-01 CRN 12307

This course is for students who have completed one year of college-level Chinese. Grammar review and training in the four basic skills to achieve higher levels of competence in speaking and listening for greater fluency in communication, reading for critical understanding, and the ability to accurately and appropriately convey basic ideas through written characters. Second Year Chinese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 20211) section and one TR (EALC 21211) lab. 

  • Second Year Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC20211-03 CRN 13753

This course is for students who have completed one year of college-level Chinese. Grammar review and training in the four basic skills to achieve higher levels of competence in speaking and listening for greater fluency in communication, reading for critical understanding, and the ability to accurately and appropriately convey basic ideas through written characters. Second Year Chinese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 20211) section and one TR (EALC 21211) lab. 

  • Second Year Readings in Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC20251-01 CRN 15566

This course is intended primarily for students who meet the prerequisites for the Second Year Chinese. It offers students opportunities to enhance their Chinese reading skills utilizing Extensive Reading method. Students will choose their own reading materials varying from graded readers to authentic texts strategically collected for them. The materials should be at or slightly below the level at which students can read smoothly and quickly without consulting dictionaries or resorting to the practice of translation. They will be guided by the instructor to read large amounts of varied and interesting self-selected materials for both pleasure and information. Incorporating other activities such as group discussions, book reports, presentations, peer tutorials, and student-instructor consultations, the course will enable students not only to boost their Chinese reading proficiency but also to enhance their general language competence, resulting in more effective reading strategies, richer vocabulary, better writing skills, and increased knowledge of Chinese history, culture, and society. 

  • Second Year Chinese I Drill, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC21211-01 CRN 13754

EALC 21211 is the corequisite lab for EALC20211. 

  • Second Year Chinese I Drill, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC21211-02 CRN 14474

EALC 21211 is the corequisite lab for EALC20211. 

  • Third Year Chinese I, Prof. Congcong Ma
    EALC30311-01 CRN 10794

This course is designed for students who have completed two years of college-level Chinese. In addition to further consolidating and enhancing the skills that students have acquired in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course will prepare students to produce paragraph-level language (both spoken and written), using a wide range of quasi-authentic materials (slightly revised for language learners), including material from news media. Third Year Chinese I is a 4 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 30311) section and one (EALC 31311) lab. 

  • Third Year Chinese I, Prof. Congcong Ma
    EALC30311-02 CRN 12817

This course is designed for students who have completed two years of college-level Chinese. In addition to further consolidating and enhancing the skills that students have acquired in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course will prepare students to produce paragraph-level language (both spoken and written), using a wide range of quasi-authentic materials (slightly revised for language learners), including material from news media. Third Year Chinese I is a 4 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 30311) section and one (EALC 31311) lab. 

  • Third Year Chinese I, Prof. Congcong Ma
    EALC30311-03 CRN 14324

This course is designed for students who have completed two years of college-level Chinese. In addition to further consolidating and enhancing the skills that students have acquired in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course will prepare students to produce paragraph-level language (both spoken and written), using a wide range of quasi-authentic materials (slightly revised for language learners), including material from news media. Third Year Chinese I is a 4 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 30311) section and one (EALC 31311) lab. 

  • Third Year Readings in Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC30351-01 CRN 14324

This course is intended primarily for students who meet the prerequisites for the Third Year Chinese. It offers students opportunities to enhance their Chinese reading skills utilizing Extensive Reading method. Students will choose their own reading materials varying from graded readers to authentic texts strategically collected for them. The materials should be at or slightly below the level at which students can read smoothly and quickly without consulting dictionaries or resorting to the practice of translation. They will be guided by the instructor to read large amounts of varied and interesting self-selected materials for both pleasure and information. Incorporating other activities such as group discussions, book reports, presentations, peer tutorials, and student-instructor consultations, the course will enable students not only to boost their Chinese reading proficiency but also to enhance their general language competence, resulting in more effective reading strategies, richer vocabulary, better writing skills, and increased knowledge of Chinese history, culture, and society. 

  • Third Year Chinese I Drill, Prof. Wei Wang
    EALC31311-01 CRN 13755

Development of greater proficiency in conversational, reading and writing skills, using a wide range of authentic materials, including material from news media. 

  • Third Year Chinese I Drill, Prof. Wei Wang
    EALC31311-02 CRN 13756

Development of greater proficiency in conversational, reading and writing skills, using a wide range of authentic materials, including material from news media. 

  • Third Year Chinese I Drill, Prof. Wei Wang
    EALC31311-03 CRN 14323

Development of greater proficiency in conversational, reading and writing skills, using a wide range of authentic materials, including material from news media. 

  • Fourth Year Chinese I, Prof. Chengxu Yin
    EALC40411-02 CRN 14308

This course will incorporate authentic materials from a variety of sources, including newspaper articles, essays, short scenes from contemporary TV series, short fiction, and video clips that will expose students to different spoken and written styles of Chinese. Students will further develop their abilities in three modes of communication - interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive - and in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Chinese. 

  • Fourth Year Chinese I, Prof. Chengxu Yin
    EALC40411-03 CRN 16010

This course will incorporate authentic materials from a variety of sources, including newspaper articles, essays, short scenes from contemporary TV series, short fiction, and video clips that will expose students to different spoken and written styles of Chinese. Students will further develop their abilities in three modes of communication - interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive - and in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Chinese. 

  • Fourth Year Readings in Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC40411-03 CRN 15568

This course is intended primarily for students who meet the prerequisites for the Fourth Year Chinese. It offers students opportunities to enhance their Chinese reading skills utilizing Extensive Reading method. Students will choose their own reading materials varying from graded readers to authentic texts strategically collected for them. The materials should be at or slightly below the level at which students can read smoothly and quickly without consulting dictionaries or resorting to the practice of translation. They will be guided by the instructor to read large amounts of varied and interesting self-selected materials for both pleasure and information. Incorporating other activities such as group discussions, book reports, presentations, peer tutorials, and student-instructor consultations, the course will enable students not only to boost their Chinese reading proficiency but also to enhance their general language competence, resulting in more effective reading strategies, richer vocabulary, better writing skills, and increased knowledge of Chinese history, culture, and society. 

  • Fourth Year Business Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC41411-01 CRN 14562

A one-credit supplement to Fourth Year Chinese, required for international economics majors and optional (with permission of the instructor) for other Fourth Year students. This lab integrates the study of Chinese language and culture with the study of business and economics. Students will learn Chinese business customs as well as practical business terms, business writing, interview strategies, and business conventions and usage in a variety of contexts. Authentic materials, such as newspapers, magazine articles, television, and films, will be used to develop advanced reading and listening skills. By completing both semesters, students will deepen their understanding of Chinese society and business culture. 

  • Advanced Chinese I, Prof. Wei Wang
    EALC50511-01 CRN 13473

This course is appropriate for majors and students with language experience overseas. The year-long sequence helps students become functional speakers, readers, and writers of modern Chinese through articles and essays from newspapers, magazines, and scholarly journals, as well as engagement with popular media and online communications. Prerequisite: successful completion of four years of Chinese language training, as determined by placement examination. The learning goals of the course are to introduce modern Chinese culture while developing advanced competence in reading, speaking, and writing standard modern Chinese. 

  • Fifth Year Readings in Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC50551-01 CRN 15569

This course is intended primarily for students who meet the prerequisites for the Fifth Year Chinese or above including students whose native language is Chinese. It offers students opportunities to enhance their Chinese reading skills utilizing Extensive Reading method. Students will choose their own reading materials varying from graded readers to authentic texts strategically collected for them. The materials should be at or slightly below the level at which students can read smoothly and quickly without consulting dictionaries or resorting to the practice of translation. They will be guided by the instructor to read large amounts of varied and interesting self-selected materials for both pleasure and information. Incorporating other activities such as group discussions, book reports, presentations, peer tutorials, and student-instructor consultations, the course will enable students not only to boost their Chinese reading proficiency but also to enhance their general language competence, resulting in more effective reading strategies, richer vocabulary, better writing skills, and increased knowledge of Chinese history, culture, and society. 

FALL 2018 Japanese Language Course Offerings

  • Elementary Japanese II, TBA
    EALJ10002-01 CRN 19628

This course is a continuation of Elementary Japanese I. It is the second half of the two 3-credit course sequence (Elementary Japanese I and II) that covers the same materials as the 5-credit First Year Japanese I. Upon completion of this course, students will be ready to enroll in First Year Japanese II (5 credits) in the following spring semester.Students will continue their acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The emphasis of the course will be on mastery of the fundamental grammatical structure of Japanese through aural-oral exercises and practice. The course covers Chapters 4-7 of NAKAMA 1. Mastery of hiragana, katakana and kanji, taught in EALJ 10001, is assumed. Additional 40 kanji will be introduced. 

  • First Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ10111-01 CRN 12250

This course is designed for students who have not studied Japanese language before. The goal of this class is to gain an acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese-reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will learn to read and write Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. This course covers Chapters 1-6 in Nakama l . First year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 10111) section and one TR (EALJ 11111) lab. 

  • First Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ10111-02 CRN 12251

This course is designed for students who have not studied Japanese language before. The goal of this class is to gain an acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese-reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will learn to read and write Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. This course covers Chapters 1-6 in Nakama l . First year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 10111) section and one TR (EALJ 11111) lab. 

  • First Year Readings in Japanese I, Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ10121-02 CRN 14872

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • First Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ11111-01 CRN 16752

EALJ 11111 is the lab corequisite of EALJ 10111 

  • First Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ11111-02 CRN 13757

EALJ 11111 is the lab corequisite of EALJ 10111 

  • Second Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ20211-01 CRN 15441

This course is designed for students who have completed one year of college-level Japanese or its equivalent. Students will build on their acquisition of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening from first year; they will increase their fluency in both speaking and listening, construct increasingly longer and more complex sentences, and recognize and produce approximately 420 kanji. This course covers Chapters 7-12 in Nakama I. Second Year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 20211) section and one TR (EALJ 21211) lab. 

  • Second Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ20211-02 CRN 10769

This course is designed for students who have completed one year of college-level Japanese or its equivalent. Students will build on their acquisition of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening from first year; they will increase their fluency in both speaking and listening, construct increasingly longer and more complex sentences, and recognize and produce approximately 420 kanji. This course covers Chapters 7-12 in Nakama I. Second Year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 20211) section and one TR (EALJ 21211) lab. 

  • Second Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ20251-02 CRN 14873

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • Second Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ21211-01 CRN 15442

EALJ 21211 is the corequisite lab of EALJ 20211. 

  • Second Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ21211-02 CRN 13758

EALJ 21211 is the corequisite lab of EALJ 20211. 

  • Third Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ30311-02 CRN 16753

A course designed for students who have completed two years of college-level Japanese. Students will expand their vocabulary and learn approximately 300 new kanji words. They will develop their understanding of Japanese culture, comparing the cultural differences between their own society and that of contemporary Japan. Students will build on their reading, writing, speaking, and listening abilities, conversing in paragraphs, not just sentences, practicing narration and description, and applying more critical and analytical reading and interpretive skills . Third year Japanese is a 4 credit course; students must enroll in both the class and the lab. 

  • Third Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ30351-01 CRN 14478

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • Third Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ31311-02 CRN 16754

EALJ 31311 is the corequisite lab to EALJ 30311 

  • Fourth Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ40411-01 CRN 19629

This is a course for students who have completed Third Year Japanese or its equivalent. Students will build on their acquisition of the four basic language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Approximately 100 new kanji compounds will be introduced. Conversational skills include making travel plans and reservations, describing physical ailments, and discussing complaints and problems with a host family. This course covers parts of Chapters 10-12 in Chuukyuu No Nihongo (An Integrated Approach to Japanese), supplemented with authentic materials such as newspaper articles, video clips, and songs. 

  • Fourth Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ40451-01 CRN 14563

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • Advanced Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ50511-01 CRN 19630

Advanced Japanese is a three-credit course for students who have completed EALJ 30312 or 40412. This course takes students beyond the grammar-centered approach of textbooks to the study and discussion of original materials produced in Japanese for everyday Japanese consumption. Course materials include excerpts from short stories, poetry, letters, social criticism, academic writing, newspaper articles, and video clips. Students may repeat the course more than once, as the content of the course changes according to the needs and interests of the students enrolled. 

  • Fifth Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ50551-01 CRN 14564

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

Fall 2018 Korean Language Course Offerings

  • Elementary Korean II, Prof. Hana Kang
    EALJ10002-01 CRN 19190

This course is a continuation of Elementary Korean I. It is the second half of the two 3-credit course sequence (Elementary Korean I and II) that covers the same materials as the 5-credit First Year Korean I. Upon completion of this course, students will be ready to enroll in First Year Korean II (5 credits) in the following spring semester. Students will continue their acquisition of the four basic language skills in Korean: reading, writing, speaking and listening. At the end of semester students will be able to understand and articulate basic idiomatic expressions and grammatical patterns (e.g., sentence structure, levels, verb tenses) and develop their understanding of aspects of Korean culture. 

  • First Year Korean I, Prof. Yeonhee Yoon
    EALJ10111-01 CRN 12704

This introductory course is designed for students who have no (or very limited) prior knowledge in Korean and provides a solid foundation in modern Korean starting from Korean alphabet Hangul. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of listening, speaking, reading, and writing of basic Korean. In addition, students will be exposed to everyday life contexts likely to be encountered in contemporary Korean society. At the end of semester students will be able to understand and articulate basic idiomatic expressions and grammatical patterns (e.g., sentence structure, speech levels, verb tenses) in conversation and writing and develop their understanding of aspects of Korean culture. First Year Korean I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in both EALK 10111 and EALK 11111. 

  • First Year Korean I Drill, Prof. Yeonhee Yoon
    EALJ11111-01 CRN 13759

EALK 11111 is the corequisite lab to EALK 10111 

  • Second Year Korean I, Prof. Yeonhee Yoon
    EALK20211-01 CRN 12849

This second year Korean is for students who have successfully finished EALK 10112 or who have permission from the instructor after taking the Korean placement exam. Students will continue building their language skills with emphasis on enhancing speaking ability, writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. The medium of instruction will be only in Korean and students are expected to use the target language as much as they can throughout the course. Second Year Korean I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in both EALK 20211 and the EALK 21211. 

  • Second Year Korean I Drill, TBA
    EALK21211-01 CRN 13760

EALK 21211 is the corequisite lab to EALK 20211. 

  • Third Year Korean l, TBA
    EALK30311-01 CRN 18820

This third year Korean is fifth in a series of Korean language courses offered at the University of Notre Dame and is designed for students who have successfully finished EALK 20212 or who have gotten permission from the instructor after taking a placement test. This course aims to develop functional proficiency in Korean at the intermediate-high level in listening, speaking, and reading and writing. Students will develop competence in fluency, grammatical accuracy and socio-linguistic/cultural appropriateness through a variety of activities and assignments. In addition, students will learn to communicate with more sophisticated grammatical structures and advanced vocabulary on various topics. This course will integrate Korean cultural themes with language learning to enhance students' learning of Korean language and to deepen their understanding of Korean culture. The specific themes that we are going to explore this semester are 1) appropriate pragmatics when apologizing, requesting, and denying, 2) the difference between indigenous language and Sino-Korean, 3) the Koreans' way of thinking which is reflected in language, and 4) social relation of Korean people, and so on. The course focuses on exploring 5Cs (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities) through more in-depth studies of Korean language and culture. Third Year Korean I is a 4 credit course; students should enroll in both EALK 30311 and EALK 31311-01. 

  • Third Year Korean l, TBA
    EALK31311-01 CRN 14477

Lab for EALK 30311. 

  • Contemporary Korean, Prof. Yeonhee Yoon
    EALK40400-01 CRN 20011

This course is designed for students who are trying to elevate their Korean language proficiency level, from Intermediate to Advanced level, by challenging themselves to understand Korean authentic/ modified media materials such as Korean TV dramas, TV shows, TV news, or documentaries. It is also designed to introduce students to contemporary Korean popular culture and the Korean culture wave. An understanding of the oral and visual authenticity of Korean media materials not only gives students a rich and varied context in which they learn the target language, but also provides an exposure to the vocabulary and grammatical structures which are beyond the students? current proficiency level. Through the contextually very-rich texts of media materials and through frequent discussions and feedback sessions, this course will also offer students an opportunity to increase their awareness about Korean culture, a crucial element in advancing their proficiency to the Advanced level. Adapting interactive and elaborated task-based and content-based instructional designs, including four modes of language learning (speaking, listening, reading and writing), this course assists and motivates students to obtain the two main objectives; increasing Korean language proficiency and gaining valuable cultural awareness. The purpose of this course is not to suggest a normative way of Korean living or generalize Korean culture, but to study diverse ways of living and to critically examine personal and social implications of the various modes of culture. 

FALL 2018 Honors Track Program

Chinese Honors Track

LLEA 58311 Chinese Honors Thesis
 
Majors in Chinese are strongly encouraged to pursue the honors track. Those who are interested must meet the following criteria: 
  • Fulfillment of all the requirements for a first major of 30 credit hours in Chinese;
  • Completion of fourth year Chinese;
  • A cumulative GPA of at least 3.3 and a GPA of at least 3.7 in the major or permission from the Department Chair. 
Requirements:  In addition to the 30 hours required for a major, the honors track requires the completion of a senior honors thesis that demonstrates the student’s originality and ability to do research in the field of study.  
  • Students are admitted into the honors track in the spring semester of their junior year and will enroll in a year-long course of study in the fall semester of their senior year.
  • Students are encouraged to apply for summer research grants between their junior and senior year to prepare for writing their senior honors thesis.  Summer research grants for this purpose are available on a competitive basis from the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts (ISLA), the Kellogg Institute, the Office for Undergraduate Studies, the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Excellence (CUSE), among others.
  • The senior honors thesis is a year-long, one on one experience with a faculty member that comprises two semester courses of 3 credit hours each.
  • The fall semester course may be a regularly scheduled upper division course or an individually designed course with the thesis advisor; these 3 credit hours may count toward the major.
  • The spring semester course is the senior thesis writing course; for completion of this course, the student receives 3 credits beyond the 30 credits required for the major.
  • The senior honors thesis must be submitted by the College deadline of late March or early April that is announced each year in the fall.
 

Japanese Honors Track

LLEA 58411 Japanese Honors Thesis
 
Majors in Japanese are strongly encouraged to pursue the honors track. Those who are interested must meet the following criteria: 
  • Fulfillment of all the requirements for a first major of 30 credit hours in Japanese; 
  •  Completion of fourth year Japanese; 
  •  A cumulative GPA of at least 3.3 and a GPA of at least 3.7 in the major or permission from the Department Chair. 
Requirements:  In addition to the 30 hours required for a major, the honors track requires the completion of a senior honors thesis that demonstrates the student’s originality and ability to do research in the field of study.  
  • Students are admitted into the honors track in the spring semester of their junior year and will enroll in a year-long course of study in the fall semester of their senior year.
  • Students are encouraged to apply for summer research grants between their junior and senior year to prepare for writing their senior honors thesis. Summer research grants for this purpose are available on a competitive basis from the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts (ISLA), the Kellogg Institute, the Office for Undergraduate Studies, the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Excellence (CUSE), among others.
  • The senior honors thesis is a year-long, one on one experience with a faculty member that comprises two semester courses of 3 credit hours each.
  • The fall semester course may be a regularly scheduled upper division course or an individually designed course with the thesis advisor; these 3 credit hours may count toward the major.
  • The spring semester course is the senior thesis writing course; for completion of this course, the student receives 3 credits beyond the 30 credits required for the major.
  • The senior honors thesis must be submitted by the College deadline of late March or early April that is announced each year in the fall.