Courses

Fall 2019 Chinese Language Course Offerings

  • Elementary Chinese II, Prof. Congcong Ma
    EALC10002-01 CRN 14573

This course is a continuation of Elementary Chinese I. It is the second half of the two 3-credit course sequence (Elementary Chinese I and II) that covers the same materials as the 5-credit First Year Chinese I. Upon completion of this course, students will be ready to enroll in First Year Chinese II (5 credits) in the following spring semester.Students will continue their acquisition of the four basic language skills in Chinese: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Additional frequently used Chinese characters, vocabulary, and fundamental grammatical structures will be introduced. The emphasis of the course will be on accurate and appropriate communication in Mandarin Chinese. 

  • First Year Chinese I, Prof. Qi Wang, Prof Congcong Ma
    EALC10111-01 3 sections (CRN 11294 CRN 11294 CRN 12211)

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese using simplified characters with equal emphasis on the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. At the end of the first year, students may expect to comprehend and produce simple questions statements, high-frequency commands, and courtesy formulas; to pronounce learned vocabulary and short phrases with correct tones; to read simple texts and standardized messages, phrases, or expressions; and to master the pinyin Romanization and write simple expressions and short sentences in simplified characters. First Year Chinese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 10111) section and one TR (EALC 11111) lab. 

  • First Year Chinese I (4-Day Track), Prof. Chengxu Yin
    EALC10121-01 CRN 14581

This course combines traditional classroom instruction with online learning. It covers the same materials as regular First Year Chinese I, and students earn 5 credits. The class meets 4 times a week (MTWR) instead of 5, with one hour of online study completed by students at a time of their convenience. Those who complete this course may take either 1st Yr Chinese 2 (4-Day Track) or First Year Chinese II in the following spring semester. 

  • First Year Readings in Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC10151-01 CRN 15158

This course is intended primarily for students who meet the prerequisites for First Year Chinese. It offers students opportunities to enhance their Chinese reading skills utilizing Extensive Reading method. Students will choose their own reading materials varying from graded readers to authentic texts strategically collected for them. The materials should be at or slightly below the level at which students can read smoothly and quickly without consulting dictionaries or resorting to the practice of translation. They will be guided by the instructor to read large amounts of varied and interesting self-selected materials for both pleasure and information. Incorporating other activities such as group discussions, book reports, presentations, peer tutorials, and student-instructor consultations, the course will enable students not only to boost their Chinese reading proficiency but also to enhance their general language competence, resulting in more effective reading strategies, richer vocabulary, better writing skills, and increased knowledge of Chinese history, culture, and society. 

  • First Year Chinese I Drill, Prof. Chengxu Yin, Congcong Ma, Qi Wang
    EALC11111-01 3 Sections (CRN 13556 CRN 13557 CRN 13555)

EALC 11111 is the lab corequisite for EALC 10111. 

  • Second Year Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC20211-01 2 sections (CRN 12191 CRN 13558)

This course is for students who have completed one year of college-level Chinese. Grammar review and training in the four basic skills to achieve higher levels of competence in speaking and listening for greater fluency in communication, reading for critical understanding, and the ability to accurately and appropriately convey basic ideas through written characters. Second Year Chinese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 20211) section and one TR (EALC 21211) lab. 

  • Second Year Readings in Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC20251-01 CRN 15159

This course is intended primarily for students who meet the prerequisites for the Second Year Chinese. It offers students opportunities to enhance their Chinese reading skills utilizing Extensive Reading method. Students will choose their own reading materials varying from graded readers to authentic texts strategically collected for them. The materials should be at or slightly below the level at which students can read smoothly and quickly without consulting dictionaries or resorting to the practice of translation. They will be guided by the instructor to read large amounts of varied and interesting self-selected materials for both pleasure and information. Incorporating other activities such as group discussions, book reports, presentations, peer tutorials, and student-instructor consultations, the course will enable students not only to boost their Chinese reading pro?ciency but also to enhance their general language competence, resulting in more effective reading strategies, richer vocabulary, better writing skills, and increased knowledge of Chinese history, culture, and society.  

  • Second Year Chinese I Drill, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC21211-01 2 sections (CRN 13559 CRN 14215)

EALC 21211 is the corequisite lab for EALC20211. 

  • Third Year Chinese I, Prof. Congcong Ma, Wei Wang
    EALC30311-01 3 Sections (CRN 19644 CRN 12681 CRN 14076)

This course is designed for students who have completed two years of college-level Chinese. In addition to further consolidating and enhancing the skills that students have acquired in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course will prepare students to produce paragraph-level language (both spoken and written), using a wide range of quasi-authentic materials (slightly revised for language learners), including material from news media. Third Year Chinese I is a 4 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALC 30311) section and one (EALC 31311) lab. 

  • Third Year Readings in Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC30351-01 CRN 15160

This course is intended primarily for students who meet the prerequisites for the Third Year Chinese. It offers students opportunities to enhance their Chinese reading skills utilizing Extensive Reading method. Students will choose their own reading materials varying from graded readers to authentic texts strategically collected for them. The materials should be at or slightly below the level at which students can read smoothly and quickly without consulting dictionaries or resorting to the practice of translation. They will be guided by the instructor to read large amounts of varied and interesting self-selected materials for both pleasure and information. Incorporating other activities such as group discussions, book reports, presentations, peer tutorials, and student-instructor consultations, the course will enable students not only to boost their Chinese reading proficiency but also to enhance their general language competence, resulting in more effective reading strategies, richer vocabulary, better writing skills, and increased knowledge of Chinese history, culture, and society. 

  • Third Year Chinese I Drill, Prof. Wei Wang, Congcong Ma
    EALC31311-01 3 sections (CRN 13560 CRN 13561 CRN 14075)

Development of greater proficiency in conversational, reading and writing skills, using a wide range of authentic materials, including material from news media. 

  • Fourth Year Chinese I, Prof. Chengxu Yin
    EALC40411-02 2 Sections (CRN 19705 CRN 14061)

This course will incorporate authentic materials from a variety of sources, including newspaper articles, essays, short scenes from contemporary TV series, short fiction, and video clips that will expose students to different spoken and written styles of Chinese. Students will further develop their abilities in three modes of communication - interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive - and in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Chinese. 

  • Fourth Year Readings in Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC40411-03 CRN 15161

This course is intended primarily for students who meet the prerequisites for the Fourth Year Chinese. It offers students opportunities to enhance their Chinese reading skills utilizing Extensive Reading method. Students will choose their own reading materials varying from graded readers to authentic texts strategically collected for them. The materials should be at or slightly below the level at which students can read smoothly and quickly without consulting dictionaries or resorting to the practice of translation. They will be guided by the instructor to read large amounts of varied and interesting self-selected materials for both pleasure and information. Incorporating other activities such as group discussions, book reports, presentations, peer tutorials, and student-instructor consultations, the course will enable students not only to boost their Chinese reading proficiency but also to enhance their general language competence, resulting in more effective reading strategies, richer vocabulary, better writing skills, and increased knowledge of Chinese history, culture, and society. 

  • Fourth Year Business Chinese I, Prof. Qi Wang
    EALC41411-01 CRN 14290

A one-credit supplement to Fourth Year Chinese, required for international economics majors and optional (with permission of the instructor) for other Fourth Year students. This lab integrates the study of Chinese language and culture with the study of business and economics. Students will learn Chinese business customs as well as practical business terms, business writing, interview strategies, and business conventions and usage in a variety of contexts. Authentic materials, such as newspapers, magazine articles, television, and films, will be used to develop advanced reading and listening skills. By completing both semesters, students will deepen their understanding of Chinese society and business culture. 

  • Advanced Chinese I, Prof. Qi Wang
    EALC50511-01 CRN 13303

This course is appropriate for majors and students with language experience overseas. The year-long sequence helps students become functional speakers, readers, and writers of modern Chinese through articles and essays from newspapers, magazines, and scholarly journals, as well as engagement with popular media and online communications. Prerequisite: successful completion of four years of Chinese language training, as determined by placement examination. The learning goals of the course are to introduce modern Chinese culture while developing advanced competence in reading, speaking, and writing standard modern Chinese. 

  • Fifth Year Readings in Chinese I, Prof. Weibing Ye
    EALC50551-01 CRN 15162

This course is intended primarily for students who meet the prerequisites for the Fifth Year Chinese or above including students whose native language is Chinese. It offers students opportunities to enhance their Chinese reading skills utilizing Extensive Reading method. Students will choose their own reading materials varying from graded readers to authentic texts strategically collected for them. The materials should be at or slightly below the level at which students can read smoothly and quickly without consulting dictionaries or resorting to the practice of translation. They will be guided by the instructor to read large amounts of varied and interesting self-selected materials for both pleasure and information. Incorporating other activities such as group discussions, book reports, presentations, peer tutorials, and student-instructor consultations, the course will enable students not only to boost their Chinese reading pro?ciency but also to enhance their general language competence, resulting in more effective reading strategies, richer vocabulary, better writing skills, and increased knowledge of Chinese history, culture, and society. 

  • Literature University Seminar, Prof. Liangyan Ge
    LLEA13186-01 CRN 13203

An introduction to the study of East Asian literature. The course will focus on either Chinese or Japanese literature. 

  • Literature University Seminar, Prof. Michael Hockx
    LLEA13186-03 CRN 19557

An introduction to the study of East Asian literature. The course will focus on either Chinese or Japanese literature. 

  • Connecting Asia, Prof. Julia Kowalski
    LLEA30002-01 CRN 19290

Many people predict that the 21st century will be the "Asian Century," dominated by China, India, and other nation-states on the continent. What does it mean to imagine an Asian future? In this class, we answer this question by rethinking connections between past, present, and future, both within and between different nations in Asia. How can we better understand the global connections between past and present if we take Asia, rather than Europe and North America, as our starting point? By contextualizing contemporary issues in Asia within global social and historical context, students will learn to move beyond common stereotypes about the region. We will use materials from history, anthropology, and literature to explore the impacts of colonialism, nationalism, and globalization on everyday life across the continent. Through this course, students will learn how analyze the intersections of personal, local, regional, and global contexts in order to better explain how Asia shapes our world. All majors and backgrounds are welcome. No prior knowledge about Asian languages or topics is required. 

  • Chinese Religious World Today, Prof. Lionel Jensen
    LLEA30108-01 CRN 19558

This new lecture and discussion course offers students a detailed introduction to the diverse, dynamic and widespread presence of religion in contemporary Chinese life. China is?increasingly?a nation of energetic religious believers. Today there are more than 95 million Christians in China, 25 million Muslims, and as many as 500,000,000 practitioners of traditional local rites of sacrifice and worship to deities and spirits (most importantly ancestors). In the last decade plural religious traditions have grown with a speed greater than that of the economic and political reforms. It is within this specific context that students will learn about the impact of religious ideas, practices, and organizations on social, political and economic phenomena and explore the role of religion in the consolidation of individual, communal, and national identity. Adopting a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, the class will ascertain the impact of `various Chinese religious traditions: Catholicism, Christianity, Islam, Daoism, Buddhism, and popular sects, on the internal socio-political structure of the Chinese state. As well the course will evaluate religions and their effects on shaping power relations on a regional, national, and local level. The class is discussion based, supplemented by lectures, student presentations, and documentary films. No knowledge of Chinese is required. 

  • Chinese Civilization & Culture, Prof. Xiaoshan Yang
    LLEA20403-01 CRN 14565​​​​​​​

​​​​​​​This course surveys Chinese culture and civilization from the beginnings to the present time. Readings include traditional historical, philosophical, political, religious and literary texts as well as modern scholarship. Students are encouraged to bring in their experience, living or reading, of Western culture in order to form comparative and reflective perspectives.

  • Chinese Popular Culture, Prof. Xian Wang
    LLEA30404-01 CRN 17521

This course introduces Chinese popular culture through the lens of contemporary Chinese cultural phenomena, including food culture, popular music, documentary films, martial arts movies, copycat culture, youth culture, and social media. It will be organized thematically. The lectures will introduce the major themes, including gender issues, social justice, government censorship, subcultures, family and state, localization and globalization, in a broad form and employ examples and case studies to provide students with a better understanding of actual Chinese society as it exists today. We will investigate the historical, sociopolitical, and aesthetical roots and impacts of the cultural phenomena.All readings are in English, no prior knowledge of Chinese language or culture is required. 

  • Contention in China, Prof. Victoria Hui
    LLEA30492-01 CRN 15247​​​​​​​

​​​​​​​Why do pro-democracy efforts in China repeatedly fail? If Chinese leaders aim to build a harmonious society, why are there routine contentious protests by workers, peasants, religious followers, middle-class property owners, lawyers, and minorities? How do the marginalized and disadvantaged fight against social injustices in China? Why is there no organized democracy movement despite the prevalence of sporadic protests? Is Confucianism preventing Chinese development towards a more democratic society? This course examines key contentious episodes in modern China, from the 1911 Revolution through the Cultural Revolution and the Tiananmen Movement to more scattered rightful resistance and minority protests in recent years. 

  • Classical Chinese, Prof. Yongping Zhu
    LLEA30501-01 CRN 14839​​​​​​​

​​​​​​​LLEA 30501 is an introductory course to classical Chinese for students who have completed at least 4th year Chinese or its equivalent. Students will learn a variety of texts ranging from idiom stories to canonical works such as Confucian Analects and Mencius. Classroom discussion emphasizes on sentence structures, the usage of grammatical particles, and Chinese culture. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to understand the main structures of classical Chinese, appreciate the differences between classical Chinese and modern Chinese, and be able to translate classical texts into modern Chinese. They will learn more about Chinese history and culture and acquire the basic skills of using classical Chinese in formal situations and writings. The course helps to lay a solid foundation for future advanced research on traditional Chinese culture or modern Chinese society. As the course is conducted exclusively in Chinese, students will also be able to solidify and enhance their proficiency in modern Chinese. Credits earned from this course may be used to fulfill Chinese major and minor requirements for upper-division courses in Chinese literature and culture. 

  • Herotism and Eroticism, Prof. Liangyan Ge
    LLEA33101-01 CRN 19559​​​​​​​

​​​​​​​In this course we will read works in Chinese fiction from the late imperial periods. We will discuss the aesthetic features of such works and their cultural underpinnings, especially the infusion of Confucian, Taoist, and Buddhist meanings. Particularly, we will focus on heroism and eroticism as two major themes in Chinese fiction and their specific expressions in each work. We will consider the transition from heroism to eroticism as a shift of narrative paradigm, which coincided with a general trend of "domestication" in traditional Chinese fiction. Through the readings and discussions, the students are expected to become familiar with pre-modern Chinese narrative tradition and acquainted with some aspects of Chinese culture. All the readings are in English translation, and no prior knowledge of China or the Chinese language is required. 

  • Chinese Literary Traditions, Prof. Xiaoshan Yang
    LLEA33102-01 CRN 14217​​​​​​​

​​​​​​​A survey course introducing students to the major themes and genres of Chinese literature through selected readings of representative texts. 

  • Introduction to Buddhism, Prof. Alexander Hsu
    LLEA33326 CRN 20467

​​​​​​​What is Buddhism? How has it managed to spread and establish itself all over Asia (and beyond)? This course argues we can best understand Buddhism through its media -- those sacred objects through which it makes itself known. We will read the Buddha's teachings and Buddhist stories. We will look at Buddhist scrolls, books, icons, and murals. And we will learn about the individuals that spread Buddhism far and the communities that keep it alive at home. All readings in English, no prerequisite knowledge required. 

  • Politics & Performane: China, Prof. Tarryn Chun
    LLEA40032-01 CRN 20467

​​​​​​​Politics has always been theatrical, but perhaps nowhere has this been taken to such an extreme as in modern China. From the celebrity-like "cult of personality" surrounding Chairman Mao Zedong to student protests to performances like the 2008 Beijing Olympics, China has been home to some of the most spectacular political displays of the last century. This course explores how and why political performance became such a prominent phenomenon in China, especially under the People's Republic (PRC), through two lines of inquiry. First, it examines how theatre and performance themselves have been used as political tools, both in support of and in protest against ruling regimes. Second, it looks at the ways in which political events such as mass rallies, show trials, and protests have taken on highly performative and theatrical qualities in the Chinese context. It considers cases that relate directly to state and Party politics, as well as to the politics of gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity. Through this course, students gain a deeper understanding of modern China, as well as the critical and theoretical tools necessary to analyze political theatre and theatrical politics in China and beyond. All readings in English or English translation. No prior study of China or Chinese language required. 

  • Directed Readings, Prof. Lionel Jensen
    LLEA46498-01 CRN 14293​​​​​​​

​​​​​​​Requires "contractual agreement" with the professor prior to scheduling. For advanced students who wish to pursue an independent research project reading advanced materials. 

  • Honors Thesis, Chinese, Michael Hockx
    LLEA58311-01 CRN 13304

​​​​​​​Majors in Chinese are strongly encouraged to pursue the honors track. Those who are interested must meet the following criteria: (1) fulfillment of all the requirements for a first major of 30 credit hours in Chinese; and (2) a cumulative GPA of at least 3.6 or permission from the department chair. In addition to the 30 hours required for a major, the honors track requires the completion of a senior honors thesis of at least 30 pages that demonstrates the student's originality and ability to do research in the target field. For this endeavor the student will receive 3 hours of graded credit. This means that to graduate with departmental honors, the student must earn 33 hours of credit in the major. Based on past experience, it is our expectation that honors projects will emerge from previous coursework where close interaction between faculty and students has planted the seeds for a larger project; from the student's leadership role in the cultural and intellectual life of the department; or as a follow up to experiences begun during his/her study abroad program. A thesis director is chosen to guide the student and provide assistance. 

  • Honors Thesis, Chinese, Prof. Lionel Jensen
    LLEA58311-02 CRN 13473

Majors in Chinese are strongly encouraged to pursue the honors track. Those who are interested must meet the following criteria: (1) fulfillment of all the requirements for a first major of 30 credit hours in Chinese; and (2) a cumulative GPA of at least 3.6 or permission from the department chair. In addition to the 30 hours required for a major, the honors track requires the completion of a senior honors thesis of at least 30 pages that demonstrates the student's originality and ability to do research in the target field. For this endeavor the student will receive 3 hours of graded credit. This means that to graduate with departmental honors, the student must earn 33 hours of credit in the major. Based on past experience, it is our expectation that honors projects will emerge from previous coursework where close interaction between faculty and students has planted the seeds for a larger project; from the student's leadership role in the cultural and intellectual life of the department; or as a follow up to experiences begun during his/her study abroad program. A thesis director is chosen to guide the student and provide assistance. 

  • Honors Thesis, Chinese, Prof. Xiaoshan Yang
    LLEA58311-03 CRN 14838

Majors in Chinese are strongly encouraged to pursue the honors track. Those who are interested must meet the following criteria: (1) fulfillment of all the requirements for a first major of 30 credit hours in Chinese; and (2) a cumulative GPA of at least 3.6 or permission from the department chair. In addition to the 30 hours required for a major, the honors track requires the completion of a senior honors thesis of at least 30 pages that demonstrates the student's originality and ability to do research in the target field. For this endeavor the student will receive 3 hours of graded credit. This means that to graduate with departmental honors, the student must earn 33 hours of credit in the major. Based on past experience, it is our expectation that honors projects will emerge from previous coursework where close interaction between faculty and students has planted the seeds for a larger project; from the student's leadership role in the cultural and intellectual life of the department; or as a follow up to experiences begun during his/her study abroad program. A thesis director is chosen to guide the student and provide assistance. 

Past Course Offerings

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