Courses

FALL 2018 Japanese Language Course Offerings

  • Elementary Japanese II, TBA
    EALJ10002-01 CRN 19628

This course is a continuation of Elementary Japanese I. It is the second half of the two 3-credit course sequence (Elementary Japanese I and II) that covers the same materials as the 5-credit First Year Japanese I. Upon completion of this course, students will be ready to enroll in First Year Japanese II (5 credits) in the following spring semester.Students will continue their acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The emphasis of the course will be on mastery of the fundamental grammatical structure of Japanese through aural-oral exercises and practice. The course covers Chapters 4-7 of NAKAMA 1. Mastery of hiragana, katakana and kanji, taught in EALJ 10001, is assumed. Additional 40 kanji will be introduced. 

  • First Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ10111-01 CRN 12250

This course is designed for students who have not studied Japanese language before. The goal of this class is to gain an acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese-reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will learn to read and write Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. This course covers Chapters 1-6 in Nakama l . First year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 10111) section and one TR (EALJ 11111) lab. 

  • First Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ10111-02 CRN 12251

This course is designed for students who have not studied Japanese language before. The goal of this class is to gain an acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese-reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will learn to read and write Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. This course covers Chapters 1-6 in Nakama l . First year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 10111) section and one TR (EALJ 11111) lab. 

  • First Year Readings in Japanese I, Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ10121-02 CRN 14872

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • First Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ11111-01 CRN 16752

EALJ 11111 is the lab corequisite of EALJ 10111 

  • First Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ11111-02 CRN 13757

EALJ 11111 is the lab corequisite of EALJ 10111 

  • Second Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ20211-01 CRN 15441

This course is designed for students who have completed one year of college-level Japanese or its equivalent. Students will build on their acquisition of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening from first year; they will increase their fluency in both speaking and listening, construct increasingly longer and more complex sentences, and recognize and produce approximately 420 kanji. This course covers Chapters 7-12 in Nakama I. Second Year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 20211) section and one TR (EALJ 21211) lab. 

  • Second Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ20211-02 CRN 10769

This course is designed for students who have completed one year of college-level Japanese or its equivalent. Students will build on their acquisition of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening from first year; they will increase their fluency in both speaking and listening, construct increasingly longer and more complex sentences, and recognize and produce approximately 420 kanji. This course covers Chapters 7-12 in Nakama I. Second Year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 20211) section and one TR (EALJ 21211) lab. 

  • Second Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ20251-02 CRN 14873

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • Second Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ21211-01 CRN 15442

EALJ 21211 is the corequisite lab of EALJ 20211. 

  • Second Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ21211-02 CRN 13758

EALJ 21211 is the corequisite lab of EALJ 20211. 

  • Third Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ30311-02 CRN 16753

A course designed for students who have completed two years of college-level Japanese. Students will expand their vocabulary and learn approximately 300 new kanji words. They will develop their understanding of Japanese culture, comparing the cultural differences between their own society and that of contemporary Japan. Students will build on their reading, writing, speaking, and listening abilities, conversing in paragraphs, not just sentences, practicing narration and description, and applying more critical and analytical reading and interpretive skills . Third year Japanese is a 4 credit course; students must enroll in both the class and the lab. 

  • Third Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ30351-01 CRN 14478

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • Third Year Japanese I Drill, TBA
    EALJ31311-02 CRN 16754

EALJ 31311 is the corequisite lab to EALJ 30311 

  • Fourth Year Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ40411-01 CRN 19629

This is a course for students who have completed Third Year Japanese or its equivalent. Students will build on their acquisition of the four basic language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Approximately 100 new kanji compounds will be introduced. Conversational skills include making travel plans and reservations, describing physical ailments, and discussing complaints and problems with a host family. This course covers parts of Chapters 10-12 in Chuukyuu No Nihongo (An Integrated Approach to Japanese), supplemented with authentic materials such as newspaper articles, video clips, and songs. 

  • Fourth Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ40451-01 CRN 14563

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

  • Advanced Japanese I, TBA
    EALJ50511-01 CRN 19630

Advanced Japanese is a three-credit course for students who have completed EALJ 30312 or 40412. This course takes students beyond the grammar-centered approach of textbooks to the study and discussion of original materials produced in Japanese for everyday Japanese consumption. Course materials include excerpts from short stories, poetry, letters, social criticism, academic writing, newspaper articles, and video clips. Students may repeat the course more than once, as the content of the course changes according to the needs and interests of the students enrolled. 

  • Fifth Year Readings in Japanese I, Prof. Noriko Hanabusa
    EALJ50551-01 CRN 14564

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students' own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class. 

Past Course Offerings

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