Courses

FALL 2016 Japanese Language Course Offerings

FALL 2016 Japanese Literature and Culture Courses

FALL 2016 Japanese Honors Track Program

SPRING 2015 Japanese Language Course Offerings

FALL 2016 Japanese Language Course Offerings

Course Title When Instructor
EALJ10002 Elementary Japanese II M W F       12:50 - 01:40 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ10111 First Year Japanese I M W F       09:25 - 10:15 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ10111 First Year Japanese I M W F       02:00 - 02:50 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ11111 First Year Japanese I Lab T R            09:30 - 10:20 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ11111 First Year Japanese I Lab T R            02:00 - 02:50 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ20211 Second Year Japanese I M W F         02:00 - 2:50 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ21211 Second Year Japanese I Lab T R            02:00 - 02:50 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ30311 Third Year Japanese I M W F       03:30 - 04:20 TBA
EALJ31311 Third Year Japanese I Lab T               03:30 - 04:20 TBA
EALJ40411 Fourth Year Japanese I T R            11:00 - 12:15 TBA
EALJ50511 Advanced Japanese I: Translation Studies TR             11:00 - 12:15 Heather Bowen-Struyk
EALJ10151 Extensive Reading in Japanese I T               03:30 - 4:20; 3:30-05:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ20251 Extensive Reading in Japanese I T               03:30 - 4:20; 3:30-05:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ30351 Extensive Reading in Japanese I R               03:30 - 4:20; 3:30-05:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ40451 Extensive Reading in Japanese I R               03:30 - 4:20; 3:30-05:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ50551 Extensive Reading in Japanese I R               03:30 - 4:20; 3:30-05:10 Noriko Hanabusa

EALJ 10002 ELEMETARY JAPANESE II 

This course is a continuation of Elementary Japanese I. It is the second half of the two 3-credit course sequence (Elementary Japanese I and II) that covers the same materials as the 5-credit First Year Japanese I. Upon completion of this course, students will be ready to enroll in First Year Japanese II (5 credits) in the following spring semester. Students will continue their acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The emphasis of the course will be on mastery of the fundamental grammatical structure of Japanese through aural-oral exercises and practice. The course covers Chapters 4–7 of NAKAMA 1. Mastery of hiragana, katakana and kanji, taught in EALJ 10001, is assumed. Additional 40 kanji will be introduced.

EALJ 10111/11111 FIRST YEAR JAPANESE I

This course is designed for students who have not studied Japanese language before. The goal of this class is to gain an acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese-reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will learn to read and write Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. This course covers Chapters 1-6 in Nakama l. First year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 10111) section and one TR (EALJ 11111) lab.

EALJ 20211/21211 SECOND YEAR JAPANESE I

This course is designed for students who have completed one year of college-level Japanese or its equivalent. Students will build on their acquisition of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening from first year; they will increase their fluency in both speaking and listening, construct increasingly longer and more complex sentences, and recognize and produce approximately 240 kanji. This course covers Chapters 1-5 in Nakama II.  Second Year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 20211) section and one TR (EALJ 21211) lab.

EALJ 30311/31311 THIRD YEAR JAPANESE I

A course designed for students who have completed two years of college-level Japanese or its equivalent. Students will expand their vocabulary and learn approximately 140 kanji (reading) and 60 kanji (writing).  Students will build on their reading, writing, speaking, and listening abilities, conversing in paragraphs, not just sentences. This course covers Chapters 1-4 in Tobira. Third year Japanese is a 4 credit course; students must enroll in both the class and the lab.

EALJ 40411 FOURTH YEAR JAPANESE I

This is a course for students who have completed three years of college-level Japanese or its equivalent. Students will practice narration and description, and applying more critical and analytical reading and interpretive skills. This course covers parts of Chapters 9-12 in Tobira, supplemented with authentic materials such as newspaper articles, and video clips.

EALJ 50511 Advanced Japanese I: Translation Studies 

This course will sharpen reading and listening comprehension through a series of translation challenges of steadily increasing difficulty.  Students will review new and already learned grammatical forms; dramatically expand vocabulary and kanji recognition; decipher the meaning of words and sentences by examining context; and learn about different reference resources – electronic and in print – and the most reliable and efficient ways to use them.  Students completing this course will be both better readers and listeners of Japanese and better translators.

EALJ 10151/EALJ 20251/EALJ 30351/ EALJ 40451/ EALJ 50551 Extensive Reading in Japanese Courses 

Prerequisite(s): EALJ 10111, EALJ 10112, EALJ 20212, EALJ 30312, EALJ 40412 respectively, or permission by the instructor.

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students’ own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class.

FALL 2016 Japanese Literature and Culture Courses  (Tentative)

LLEA 13186 Literature University Seminar: "The Other in Modern Japanese Fiction"
 
TR 02:00-03:15                                                          Michael Brownstein
 
In this course, we will study five novels by modern Japanese writers (in translation) as a way of exploring the theme of “Otherness” — the sense of being an outsider, of being different, or at odds with a society that values conformity or “fitting in” above all. The novels are: Silence by Shusaku Endo, Kokoro by Natsume Soseki, Masks by Enchi Fumiko, A Personal Matter by Oe Kenzaburo, and All She Was Worth by Miyuki Miyabe. By reading, discussing, and writing about these novels, you will also have the opportunity to explore how fictional narratives work to produce meaning, share your critical insights with others and improve your writing skills.
 
LLEA 20115  Religion and the Visual Arts, in Christianity and Buddhism
 
TR 02:00-03:15                                                          Robert Gimello 
 
A study of the ways in which religious ideas and values are conveyed in images as distinct from texts, focusing on major works of art (paintings, sculptures, architecture) from the Christian along with comparable with and equivalent works from the Buddhist tradition, and addressing especially the many arguments and tensions abounding in religion about the proper role of the visual arts in religion.
 
LLEA 20841 Conflict and Cooperation in International Relations of East Asia                                                                                                         

TR       09:30-10:45                                                     Kiwoong Yang

East Asia is defined as the region encompassing China, Koreas, Japan, Taiwan, Southeast Asia and the Russian Far East. There are signs of regional conflict in East Asia. Meanwhile, there are signs that may lead to regional cooperation in the twenty­first century. This course examines the tensions between increasing interdependence among the nations in East Asia and the preservation of national sovereignty and conflicts over territories, identities and history. The central question is whether the East Asian region is heading towards greater peace and cooperation or war and conflict in the twenty-first century. We will also focus on the role of the United States in the region since it has been extensively involved in the region since the 1850s.

LLEA 30110  Ancient Japan 
 
MW 03:30-04:45                                                           Julia Thomas
 
History is not a single "true story," but many competing narratives, each defined by values, interests, and political commitments. This course on ancient Japanese history provides an overview of three sets of competing narratives: first, the politically charged question of Japan's origins, when we explore archeological evidence and chronicles of the Sun Goddess; second, the question of whether culture (through continental imports of writing, religious forms, and statecraft) or nature (as disease and environmental degradation) defined the Yamato state from the sixth to the ninth century; and, third, whether Heian court power rested on economic, political, military, judicial, or aesthetic grounds and if its foundations were undermined internally or by the invasion of the Mongols. In examining these competing narratives, we aim to develop the disciplined imagination necessary to enter another culture and another time.
 
LLEA 33308 Japanese Literature as World Literature
 
TR 12:30-01:45                                                           Heather Bowen-Struyk
 
This course surveys Chinese culture and civilization from the beginnings to the present time. Readings include traditional historical, philosophical, political, religious and literary texts as well as modern scholarship. Students are encouraged to bring in their experience, living or reading, of Western culture in order to form comparative and reflective perspectives.
                                                      
LLEA 33317 The Samurai in Classical Japanese Literature
 
MW 02:00-03:15                                                             Michael Brownstein
 
The sword-wielding samurai warrior is perhaps the most familiar icon of pre-modern Japan, one that continues to influence how the Japanese think of themselves and how others think of Japan even in modern times. Who were the samurai? How did they see themselves? How did other members of Japanese society see them in the past? How did the role and the image of the samurai change over time? To answer these questions, we will explore the depiction of samurai in various kinds of texts: episodes from quasi-historical chronicles, 14th-century Noh plays, 17th-century short stories, and 18th-century Kabuki and puppet plays. While some of these texts emphasize themes of loyalty, honor, and military prowess, others focus on the problems faced by samurai in their domestic lives during times of peace. The last part of the course will be devoted to the most famous of all stories, The Revenge of the 47 Samurai. Students will read eyewitness accounts of this vendetta, which occurred in 1702, and then explore how the well-known Kabuki/puppet play Chushingura (A Treasury of Loyal Retainers 1748) dramatizes the conflicting opinions surrounding it. All readings will be in English translation and no previous knowledge of Japan is required.
 
LLEA 30426  Special Studies

TBA                                                            TBA

LLEA 46498 Directed Readings

TBA                                                            TBA

FALL 2016 Japanese Honors Track Program

LLEA 58411 Honors Thesis, Japanese

TBA                                                           TBA

LLEA 58411 Japanese Honors Thesis

Majors in Japanese are strongly encouraged to pursue the honors track. Those who are interested must meet the following criteria:

  • Fulfillment of all the requirements for a first major of 30 credit hours in Japanese; 

  • Completion of fourth year Japanese;

  • A cumulative GPA of at least 3.3 and a GPA of at least 3.7 in the major or permission from the Department Chair.

Requirements:  In addition to the 30 hours required for a major, the honors track requires the completion of a senior honors thesis that demonstrates the student’s originality and ability to do research in the field of study.  

  • Students are admitted into the honors track in the spring semester of their junior year and will enroll in a year-long course of study in the fall semester of their senior year.

  • Students are encouraged to apply for summer research grants between their junior and senior year to prepare for writing their senior honors thesis.  Summer research grants for this purpose are available on a competitive basis from the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts (ISLA), the Kellogg Institute, the Office for Undergraduate Studies, the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Excellence (CUSE), among others.

  • The senior honors thesis is a year-long, one on one experience with a faculty member that comprises two semester courses of 3 credit hours each.

  • The fall semester course may be a regularly scheduled upper division course or an individually designed course with the thesis advisor; these 3 credit hours may count toward the major.

  • The spring semester course is the senior thesis writing course; for completion of this course, the student receives 3 credits beyond the 30 credits required for the major.

  • The senior honors thesis must be submitted by the College deadline of late March or early April that is announced each year in the fall.  

SPRING 2015 Japanese Language Course Offerings

Course Title When Instructor
EALJ10001-01 Elementary Japanese I M W F    12:50 - 01:40 Naoki Fuse, Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ10112-01 First-Year Japanese II M W F    09:25 - 10:15 Noriko Hanabusa, RyokoYano
EALJ10112-02 First-Year Japanese II M W F    02:00 - 02:50 Noriko Hanabusa, RyokoYano
EALJ10152-01 Extensive Reading in Jpn. II R             04:30 - 06:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ11112-01 First Year Japanese II Lab T R          09:30 - 10:20 Noriko Hanabusa, RyokoYano
EALJ11112-02 First Year Japanese II Lab T R          02:00 - 02:50 Noriko Hanabusa, RyokoYano
EALJ20212-01 Second-Year Japanese II M W F     09:25 - 10:15 Naoki Fuse
EALJ20252-01 Extensive Reading in Jpn. II R             04:30 - 06:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ21212-01 Second Year Japanese II Lab T R          09:30 - 10:20 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ30312-01 Third Year Japanese II M W F     02:00 - 02:50 Naoki Fuse
EALJ30352-01 Extensive Reading in Jpn. II R 0          04:30 -0 6:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ31312-01 Third Year Japanese II Lab T              03:30 - 04:20 Naoki Fuse
EALJ40412-01 Fourth-Year Japanese II T R          02:00 - 03:15 Naoki Fuse
EALJ40452-01 Extensive Reading in Jpn. II R              04:30 - 06:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ41411-01 Fourth Year Business Jpn I Lab M             03:30 - 04:20 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ50552-01 Extensive Reading in Jpn. II R              04:30 - 06:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ57001-01 Special Studies T R          02:00 - 03:15 Naoki Fuse

EALJ 10001 Elementary Japanese I

This course is designed for students who have not studied Japanese language before. The goal of this class is to gain an acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese-reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will learn to read and write Hiragana, Katakana and 20 Kanji. This course covers Chapters 1-4 in Nakama l .

EALJ 10112/11112  First Year Japanese II

This course is designed for students who have completed the equivalent of First Year Japanese I. The goal of this class is to gain an acquisition of the four basic language skills in Japanese-reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will learn to read and write Hiragana, Katakana and approximately 130 Kanji. This course covers Chapters 7-12 in Nakama l . First year Japanese II is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 10112) section and one TR (EALJ 11112) lab.

EALJ 20212/21212  Second Year Japanese II

This course is designed for students who have completed Second Year Japanese I or its equivalent. Students will build on their acquisition of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening; they will increase their fluency in both speaking and listening, construct increasingly longer and more complex sentences, and recognize and produce approximately 370 kanji. This course covers Chapters 6-11 in Nakama II. Second Year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 20212) section and one TR (EALJ 21212) lab.

EALJ 30312/31312  Third Year Japanese II

This course is designed for students who have completed Second Year Japanese I or its equivalent. Students will build on their acquisition of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening; they will increase their fluency in both speaking and listening, construct increasingly longer and more complex sentences, and recognize and produce approximately 370 kanji. This course covers Chapters 6-11 in Nakama II. Second Year Japanese I is a 5 credit course; students should enroll in one MWF (EALJ 20212) section and one TR (EALJ 21212) lab.

EALJ 40412/41412  Fourth Year Japanese II

This is a course for students who have completed Fourth Year Japanese I or equivalent. Students will build on their acquisition of the four basic language skills-reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will practice narration and description, and applying more critical and analytical reading and interpretive skills. This course covers parts of Chapters 13-15 in Chuukyuu No Nihongo (An Integrated Approach to Japanese), supplemented with authentic materials such as newspaper articles, and video clips.

Fourth Year Business Japanese I Lab

A one-credit supplement to Fourth Year Japanese, required for international economics majors and optional (with permission of the instructor) for other Fourth Year students. This lab integrates the study of Japanese language and culture with the study of business and economics. Students will learn Japanese business customs as well as practical business terms, business writing, interview strategies, and business conventions and usage in a variety of contexts. Authentic materials, such as newspapers, magazine articles, television, and films, will be used to develop advanced reading and listening skills. By completing both semesters, students will deepen their understanding of Japanese society and business culture.

EALJ 10152/20252/30352/40452/50552 Extensive Reading in Japanese II

In this course, students choose their own Japanese reading materials from the Hesburgh Library Collection and read them independently at their own pace using the Extensive Reading method. Tadoku (Extensive Reading) means to read books for students? own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which they can read smoothly and quickly without looking up words or translating. Students will read many books that are at or slightly below the level at which they read fluently, while the instructor carefully monitors their reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions. Students will gradually develop vocabulary and kanji knowledge, prediction skills, and skills to read more complex sentences with ease. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor. Additional activities, such as group discussions, journal writing, presentations, and shadowing may be incorporated into the class.

EALJ 57001  Special Sudies

This 3-credit special studies course is designed for students who have completed Fourth Year Japanese or above. On the basis of their existing Japanese proficiency level, students will receive further training in all four language skills, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Course materials include excerpts from short stories, newspaper articles, academic writing, and video clips.

Past Course Offerings

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