Courses

Language courses are offered in Chinese, Japanese and Korean from begining to advanced levels.

The department also has several literature and culture courses that are taught in English for those unable to study the language but interested in the traditions.

FALL 2015 Chinese Language Course Offerings

Course

Title

When

Instructor

EALC10002

Elementary Chinese II

M W F - 12:50P - 1:40P

Congcong Ma

EALC10111

First-Year Chinese I 

T R - 9:30A - 10:20A

Yongping Zhu/Chengxu Yin

EALC10111

First-Year Chinese I 

T R - 11:00P - 11:50P

Yongping Zhu/Chengxu Yin

EALC10111

First-Year Chinese I

T R - 2:00P - 2:50P

Yongping Zhu/Chengxu Yin

EALC11111

First Year Chinese I Drill

M W F - 9:25A - 10:15A

Wei Wang

EALC11111

First Year Chinese I Drill

M W F - 11:30A - 12:20P

STAFF

EALC11111

First Year Chinese I Drill

M W F - 12:50P - 1:40P

Congcong Ma

EALC11111

First Year Chinese I Drill

M W F - 2:00P - 2:50P

Chengxu Yin

EALC10121

Hybrid First Year Chinese I

M W - 10:30A - 11:20A

T R - 11:00A - 11:50A

Chengxu Yin 

EALC10201

Accelerated Chinese I

MTWRF - 2:00P - 2:50P

STAFF

EALC20211

Second Year Chinese I

M W F - 10:30A - 11:20A

Weibing Ye

EALC20211

Second Year Chinese I

M W F - 11:30A - 12:20P

Wei Wang

EALC20211

Second Year Chinese I

M W F - 2:00P - 2:50P

Wei Wang 

EALC21211

Second Year Chinese I Lab

T R - 2:00P - 2:50P

Weibing Ye

EALC21211

Second Year Chinese I Lab

T R - 11:00A - 11:50A

Weibing Ye

EALC21211

Second Year Chinese I Lab

T R - 3:30P - 4:20P

Wei Wang

EALC30311

Third Year Chinese I

M W F - 10:30A - 11:20A

STAFF

EALC30311

Third Year Chinese I

 M W F - 11:30A - 12:20P

Chengxu Yin

EALC30311

Third Year Chinese I

M W F - 12:50P - 1:40P

STAFF

EALC31311

Third Year Chinese I Lab

R - 11:00 - 11:50

STAFF

EALC31311

Third Year Chinese I Lab

R - 2:00P - 2:50P

STAFF

EALC31311

Third Year Chinese I Lab

R - 3:30P - 4:20P

STAFF

EALC40411

Fourth Year Chinese I

M W F - 12:50P - 1:40P

Liangyan Ge

EALC40411

Fourth Year Chinese I

M W F - 11:30A - 12:20P

Wei Wang

EALC41411

FOURTH YEAR BUSINESS CHINESE I

T - 2:00P - 2:50P

Wei Wang

EALC50511

ADVANCED CHINESE (3.0)

M W F - 12:50P - 1:40P

Weibing Ye

FALL 2015 Japanese Language Course Offerings

Course Title When Instructor
EALJ10002 Elementary Japanese II M W F       12:50 - 01:40 Noriko Hanabusa/Naoki Fuse
EALJ10111 First Year Japanese I M W F       09:25 - 10:15 Noriko Hanabusa/Naoki Fuse
EALJ10111 First Year Japanese I M W F       02:00 - 02:50 Noriko Hanabusa/Naoki Fuse
EALJ11111 First Year Japanese I Lab T R            09:30 - 10:20 Noriko Hanabusa/Naoki Fuse
EALJ11111 First Year Japanese I Lab T R            02:00 - 02:50 Noriko Hanabusa/Naoki Fuse
EALJ20211 Second Year Japanese I M W F         02:00 - 2:50 Noriko Hanabusa/Naoki Fuse
EALJ21211 Second Year Japanese I Lab T R            02:00 - 02:50 Noriko Hanabusa/Naoki Fuse
EALJ30311 Third Year Japanese I M W F       03:30 - 04:20 Naoki Fuse
EALJ31311 Third Year Japanese I Lab T               03:30 - 04:20 Naoki Fuse
EALJ40411 Fourth Year Japanese I T R            11:00 - 12:15 Naoki Fuse
EALJ50511 Advanced Japanese I: Translation Studies TR             11:00 - 12:15 Heather Bowen-Struyk
EALJ10151 Extensive Reading in Japanese  T               03:30 - 4:20; 3:30-05:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ20251 Extensive Reading in Japanese T               03:30 - 4:20; 3:30-05:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ30351 Extensive Reading in Japanese R               03:30 - 4:20; 3:30-05:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ40451 Extensive Reading in Japanese R               03:30 - 4:20; 3:30-05:10 Noriko Hanabusa
EALJ50551 Extensive Reading in Japanese R               03:30 - 4:20; 3:30-05:10 Noriko Hanabusa

FALL 2015 Korean Language Course Offerings

Course Title When Instructor
EALK 10111 First Year Korean I MW       09:30-10:45 Yeonhee Yoon
EALK 11111 First Year Korean I Lab  TR   09:30-10:20 Yeonhee Yoon
EALK 20211 Second Year Korean I  MW     11:00-12:15 Yeonhee Yoon
EALK 21211 Second Year Korean I Lab TR       11:00-11:50 Yeonhee Yoon
EALK 30311 Third Year Korean I MTW     2:00-02:50 Hana Kang
EALK 31311 Third Year Korean I Lab R         02:00-02:50 Hana Kang
EALK10151 Extended Korean Literacy Learning MW 12:30-1:20 Hana Kang
EALK20251 Extended Korean Literacy Learning MW 12:30-1:45 Hana Kang
EALK30351 Extended Korean Literacy Learning MW 12:30-1:20 Hana Kang

FALL 2015 East Asian Literature and Culture Courses  

LLEA 13186 Literature University Seminar: "The Other in Modern Japanese Fiction"
 
TR 02:00-03:15                                                          Michael Brownstein
 
In this course, we will study five novels by modern Japanese writers (in translation) as a way of exploring the theme of “Otherness” — the sense of being an outsider, of being different, or at odds with a society that values conformity or “fitting in” above all. The novels are: Silence by Shusaku Endo, Kokoro by Natsume Soseki, Masks by Enchi Fumiko, A Personal Matter by Oe Kenzaburo, and All She Was Worth by Miyuki Miyabe. By reading, discussing, and writing about these novels, you will also have the opportunity to explore how fictional narratives work to produce meaning, share your critical insights with others and improve your writing skills.


LLEA 13186  Literature University Seminar: Love in Traditional Chinese Literature

TR 11:00-12:15                                                         Liangyan Ge

The goal of this course is to introduce first-year students to the Chinese notion of love as fostered by traditional Chinese ideological systems, Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. We will examine the different love relationships in thesocial and familial contexts, especially filial love, parental love, and sexual love, and discuss their literary expressions in poetry and prose from different historical periods. Love will be considered as both a perennial theme in Chinese literature and a major reflector of traditional Chinese culture. Readings are all in English translation, and no prior knowledge of Chinese language or culture is required for taking the course. Writing is a significant component of the course. There will be a number of writing projects, and issues concerning paper-writing will be discussed both in class and in private conferences. Students are also expected to read the assigned texts carefully before each session and participate actively in discussions and other class activities.

 
LLEA 20001  Introduction to Linguistics 
 
TR 03:30-04:45                                                          Hana Kang 
 
This course emphasizes language structure, including phonetics (the sounds of language), phonology (the sound systems of language), morphology and lexicon (structured meanings in words), morphemes (units of meaning), syntax, and semantics. 
 
LLEA 20115  Religion and the Visual Arts, in Christianity and Buddhism
 
TR 02:00-03:15                                                          Robert Gimello 
 
A study of the ways in which religious ideas and values are conveyed in images as distinct from texts, focusing on major works of art (paintings, sculptures, architecture) from the Christian along with comparable with and equivalent works from the Buddhist tradition, and addressing especially the many arguments and tensions abounding in religion about the proper role of the visual arts in religion.
 
LLEA 20202  Sociolinguistics of Second Language Acquisition 
 
TR TBD                                                          Hana Kang 
 
This course emphasizes language structure, including phonetics (the sounds of language), phonology (the sound systems of language), morphology and lexicon (structured meanings in words), morphemes (units of meaning), syntax, and semantics. 
 
LLEA 20841 Conflict and Cooperation in International Relations of East Asia                                                                                                         

TR       09:30-10:45                                                     Kiwoong Yang

East Asia is defined as the region encompassing China, Koreas, Japan, Taiwan, Southeast Asia and the Russian Far East. There are signs of regional conflict in East Asia. Meanwhile, there are signs that may lead to regional cooperation in the twenty­first century. This course examines the tensions between increasing interdependence among the nations in East Asia and the preservation of national sovereignty and conflicts over territories, identities and history. The central question is whether the East Asian region is heading towards greater peace and cooperation or war and conflict in the twenty-first century. We will also focus on the role of the United States in the region since it has been extensively involved in the region since the 1850s.

 
LLEA 30108  The Chinese Religious World Today: Catholicism, Christianity, Islam, and Other Popular Faiths
 
TR 11:00-12:15                                                          Lionel Jensen
 
This new lecture and discussion course offers students a detailed introduction to the diverse, dynamic and widespread presence of religion in contemporary Chinese life. China is—increasingly—a nation of energetic religious believers. Today there are more than 95 million Christians in China, 25 million Muslims, and as many as 500,000,000 practitioners of traditional local rites of sacrifice and worship to deities and spirits (most importantly ancestors). In the last decade plural religious traditions have grown with a speed greater than that of the economic and political reforms.  It is within this specific context that students will learn about the impact of religious ideas, practices, and organizations on social, political and economic phenomena and explore the role of religion in the consolidation of individual, communal, and national identity. Adopting a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, the class will ascertain the impact of `various Chinese religious traditions: Catholicism, Christianity, Islam, Daoism, Buddhism, and popular sects, on the internal socio-political structure of the Chinese state. As well the course will evaluate religions and their effects on shaping power relations on a regional, national, and local level. The class is discussion based, supplemented by lectures, student presentations, and documentary films. No knowledge of Chinese is required.
 
LLEA 30110  Ancient Japan 
 
MW 03:30-04:45                                                           Julia Thomas
 
History is not a single "true story," but many competing narratives, each defined by values, interests, and political commitments. This course on ancient Japanese history provides an overview of three sets of competing narratives: first, the politically charged question of Japan's origins, when we explore archeological evidence and chronicles of the Sun Goddess; second, the question of whether culture (through continental imports of writing, religious forms, and statecraft) or nature (as disease and environmental degradation) defined the Yamato state from the sixth to the ninth century; and, third, whether Heian court power rested on economic, political, military, judicial, or aesthetic grounds and if its foundations were undermined internally or by the invasion of the Mongols. In examining these competing narratives, we aim to develop the disciplined imagination necessary to enter another culture and another time.
 
LLEA 30151  China's Long 20th Century
 
TR 09:30-10:45                                                           Elisabeth Koll
 
The course examines China’s modern history from the last decade of the 19th century to the present. It explores the great political, economic, and social transformations with a particular focus on identifying continuities and discontinuities in China’s historical development across the 20th century. The course emphasize China’s global interconnections and develop a framework for assessing the role of nationalism, communism, and capitalism in the making of modern China.
 
LLEA 30403  Introduction to Chinese Civilization and Culture 
 
TR 02:00-03:15                                                           Xiaoshan Yang
 
This course surveys Chinese culture and civilization from the beginnings to the present time. Readings include traditional historical, philosophical, political, religious and literary texts as well as modern scholarship. Students are encouraged to bring in their experience, living or reading, of Western culture in order to form comparative and reflective perspectives.
 
LLEA 33308 Japanese Literature as World Literature
 
TR 12:30-01:45                                                           Heather Bowen-Struyk
 
This course surveys Chinese culture and civilization from the beginnings to the present time. Readings include traditional historical, philosophical, political, religious and literary texts as well as modern scholarship. Students are encouraged to bring in their experience, living or reading, of Western culture in order to form comparative and reflective perspectives.
                                                         
 
LLEA 33102  Chinese Literary Traditions
 
TR 03:30-04:45                                                            Xiaoshan Yang
 
A survey course introducing students to the major themes and genres of Chinese literature through selected readings of representative texts.
 
LLEA 33317 The Samurai in Classical Japanese Literature
 
MW 02:00-03:15                                                             Michael Brownstein
 
The sword-wielding samurai warrior is perhaps the most familiar icon of pre-modern Japan, one that continues to influence how the Japanese think of themselves and how others think of Japan even in modern times. Who were the samurai? How did they see themselves? How did other members of Japanese society see them in the past? How did the role and the image of the samurai change over time? To answer these questions, we will explore the depiction of samurai in various kinds of texts: episodes from quasi-historical chronicles, 14th-century Noh plays, 17th-century short stories, and 18th-century Kabuki and puppet plays. While some of these texts emphasize themes of loyalty, honor, and military prowess, others focus on the problems faced by samurai in their domestic lives during times of peace. The last part of the course will be devoted to the most famous of all stories, The Revenge of the 47 Samurai. Students will read eyewitness accounts of this vendetta, which occurred in 1702, and then explore how the well-known Kabuki/puppet play Chushingura (A Treasury of Loyal Retainers 1748) dramatizes the conflicting opinions surrounding it. All readings will be in English translation and no previous knowledge of Japan is required.
 
LLEA 30426  Special Studies

TBA                                                            TBA

LLEA 46498 Directed Readings

TBA                                                            TBA

LLEA 58311 Honors Thesis, Chinese

TBA                                                           Dian H. Murray

LLEA 58311 Honors Thesis, Chinese

F 5:05-5:55                                              Lionel Jensen

LLEA 58311 Honors Thesis, Chinese

TBA                                                           Xiaoshan Yang

LLEA 30501 Classical Chinese

MW 2:00-3:15                                                           Yongping Zhu

This is an introductory course to classical Chinese for students who have completed at least 4th year Chinese or its equivalent. Students will learn a variety of texts ranging from idiom stories to canonical works such as Confucian Analects and Mencius. Classroom discussion emphasizes on sentence structures, the usage of grammatical particles, and Chinese culture. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to understand the main structures of classical Chinese, appreciate the differences between classical Chinese and modern Chinese, and be able to translate classical texts into modern Chinese. They will learn more about Chinese history and culture and acquire the basic skills of using classical Chinese in formal situations and writings. The course helps to lay a solid foundation for future advanced research on traditional Chinese culture or modern Chinese society. As the course is conducted exclusively in Chinese, students will also be able to solidify and enhance their proficiency in modern Chinese. Credits earned from this course may be used to fulfill Chinese major and minor requirements for upper-division courses in Chinese literature and culture.

LLEA 58411 Honors Thesis, Japanese

TBA                                                           TBA

LLEA 20001 Introduction to Linguistics 
 
MW 3:30-4:45                                                            Hana Kang

This course provides a background in several core areas of the study of human language: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and social aspects of language and language change

LLEA 20202 Sociolinguistics of Second Language Acquisition 
 
TR 3:30-4:45                                                            Hana Kang

In this course, you will learn sociolinguistic theories in relation to second/foreign language acquisition and teaching. You will also examine those places where language and culture come together to affect our interactions, concentrating on areas particularly important to language teaching, learning, and usage.

FALL 2015 Honors Track Program

 
LLEA 58311 Chinese Honors Thesis
 
Majors in Chinese are strongly encouraged to pursue the honors track. Those who are interested must meet the following criteria: 
  • Fulfillment of all the requirements for a first major of 30 credit hours in Chinese;
  • Completion of fourth year Chinese;
  • A cumulative GPA of at least 3.3 and a GPA of at least 3.7 in the major or permission from the Department Chair. 
Requirements:  In addition to the 30 hours required for a major, the honors track requires the completion of a senior honors thesis that demonstrates the student’s originality and ability to do research in the field of study.  
  • Students are admitted into the honors track in the spring semester of their junior year and will enroll in a year-long course of study in the fall semester of their senior year.
  • Students are encouraged to apply for summer research grants between their junior and senior year to prepare for writing their senior honors thesis.  Summer research grants for this purpose are available on a competitive basis from the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts (ISLA), the Kellogg Institute, the Office for Undergraduate Studies, the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Excellence (CUSE), among others.
  • The senior honors thesis is a year-long, one on one experience with a faculty member that comprises two semester courses of 3 credit hours each.
  • The fall semester course may be a regularly scheduled upper division course or an individually designed course with the thesis advisor; these 3 credit hours may count toward the major.
  • The spring semester course is the senior thesis writing course; for completion of this course, the student receives 3 credits beyond the 30 credits required for the major.
  • The senior honors thesis must be submitted by the College deadline of late March or early April that is announced each year in the fall.
 
LLEA 58411 Japanese Honors Thesis
 
Majors in Japanese are strongly encouraged to pursue the honors track. Those who are interested must meet the following criteria: 
  • Fulfillment of all the requirements for a first major of 30 credit hours in Japanese; 
  •  Completion of fourth year Japanese; 
  •  A cumulative GPA of at least 3.3 and a GPA of at least 3.7 in the major or permission from the Department Chair. 
Requirements:  In addition to the 30 hours required for a major, the honors track requires the completion of a senior honors thesis that demonstrates the student’s originality and ability to do research in the field of study.  
  • Students are admitted into the honors track in the spring semester of their junior year and will enroll in a year-long course of study in the fall semester of their senior year.
  • Students are encouraged to apply for summer research grants between their junior and senior year to prepare for writing their senior honors thesis. Summer research grants for this purpose are available on a competitive basis from the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts (ISLA), the Kellogg Institute, the Office for Undergraduate Studies, the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Excellence (CUSE), among others.
  • The senior honors thesis is a year-long, one on one experience with a faculty member that comprises two semester courses of 3 credit hours each.
  • The fall semester course may be a regularly scheduled upper division course or an individually designed course with the thesis advisor; these 3 credit hours may count toward the major.
  • The spring semester course is the senior thesis writing course; for completion of this course, the student receives 3 credits beyond the 30 credits required for the major.
  • The senior honors thesis must be submitted by the College deadline of late March or early April that is announced each year in the fall.

Spring 2015 Culture and Literature Course Offerings

Course Title When Instructor
LLEA13186-01 Literature University Seminar T R         02:00 - 03:15 Michael Brownstein
LLEA13186-02 Literature University Seminar T R         03:30 - 04:45 Xiaoshan Yang
LLEA20001-01 Introduction to Linguistics M W        03:30 - 04:45 Hana Kang
LLEA30001-01 Introduction to Second Language Acquisition T R         03:30 - 04:45 Hana Kang
LLEA30101-01 Chinese Ways of Thought T R         11:00 - 12:15 Lionel Jensen
LLEA30109-01 Chinese Literature and Religion T R         02:00 - 03:15 Xiaoshan Yang
LLEA30340-01 Exploring Korean History and Culture T R          09:30 - 10:45 Yeonhee Yoon
LLEA33318-01 Cool Japan T R          12:30 - 01:45 Heather Bowen-Struyk
LLEA33319-01 Masterpieces of Japanese Literature M W         03:30 - 04:45 Michael Brownstein
LLEA33320-01 Modern Japanese Literature T R          11:00 - 12:15 Heather Bowen-Struyk
LLEA-40601-01 History of Chinese Medicine T R          09:30 - 10:45 Dina Murray